Friday, 17 February 2017

PUBLICATIONS of Prof. Dr. Isamu HAYAKAWA


 PUBLICATIONS

of

 Prof. Dr. Isamu HAYAKAWA


The following publications are written in Japanese except those mentioned at the end of each article.


[BOOKS]

*1985.5 Contrastive Linguistics and English Teaching in Japan. Tokyo: San’yusha, 321pp.

*1990.7 An Introduction to English Lexicography for High School Teachers. Tokyo: San’yusha, 202pp.

*1990.9 A Contrastive Study of English and Japanese and its Application to the Teaching of English in Japan. MA Thesis Submitted to Pacific Lutheran University. [Written in English]

*1997.3 Compiling Methodology of Early English-Japanese Dictionaries. Nagoya: Chubu-Nihon Kyoiku-Bunkakai, 200pp. [Doctoral Thesis Submitted to Osaka University]

*1998.1 Webster’s Dictionaries and English-Japanese Dictionaries. Nagoya: Chubu-Nihon Kyoiku-Bunkakai, 223pp.

*1998.5 A Chronological List of English Dictionaries Published in Japan before 1945. Institute of the Studies of Human Environments, 116pp.

*1999.3 An Introduction to Contrastive Linguistics. Kyoto: Est Publishing Company, 140pp. [Written in English]

*1999.6 Mind and Communication. Eds. Takeichi, Watanabe and Hayakawa. Tokyo: Keso-Shobo, 328pp.

*2001.3 Dynamism of Compiling Methodology of English Dictionaries Published in Japan. Tokyo: Jiyusha, 532pp.


『辞書編纂のダイナミズムージョンソン、ウェブスターと日本ー』の正誤表
 頁  行     該当部分          
  6  下から5     『東洋学会雑誌』          『東洋学芸雑誌』
 15  0.1  1    [a litte]                       [a little]
 16  0.2  9    [accoding to,~]         [according to,~]
 17  4              (1912)                        (1917)
 50  下から8     惣郷正明 (1988)           惣郷正明 (1973)
 54  16            または v.a. et a.           または v.n. et a.
 98  13            itszke                          iitszke
104  14          「意を注意すること」    「意を注すること」
124  19           失望させたちがいない     失望させたにちがいない
127  10          『袖珍辞典』                『袖珍辞書』
132  6             ほんとんど                   ほとんど
150  11           如ク[]之レヲ用フル時ハ  ノ如ク[]之レヲ人ニ用フル時ハ
150  下から1    松村守義                      村松守義
163  3             ever blowing                over blowing
165  23           Embat’tled                   Embat’telled
165  下から1    and annexted               and annexed
181  下から7    arithetick                     arithmetick
218  下から7    angel                           angle
283  6             bull-fog                       bull-frog
298  下から5    12千語                      15千語
342  8)       小野茂                          小野茂の解説
347  15          池田 1967                     池田 1968
466  25           (追加)    早川勇 (1981):『英文法の新しい考え方学び方』三友社出版.
468  下から13  (追加)    石原千里 (1994):「『福翁自伝』の英学史関連記述について」『英学史研究』第27 pp. 179-192. 
476  8           『箕作麟祥伝』              『箕作麟祥君伝』
478  18         「開拓使版英語辞書」     「開拓使版英和辞書」
480 13         福地源一                       福地源一郎
474  11           (追加)    中濱博 (1991):『私のジョン万次郎』小学館.                             

*2001.10  Methods of Plagiarism -A History of English-Japanese Lexicography-. Tokyo: Jiyusha, 344pp. [Written in English]

*2003.12  Japanese Words in English. Tokyo: Jiyusha, 485pp.

*2004.12  A Comprehensive Catalogue of Webster’s Dictionaries. Tokyo: Jiyusha, 164pp.

『ウェブスター辞書の系譜』の正誤表
 p. 3 下の表中 イラスト集 ⇒ イラスト
 p. 6 右 l. 26 404pp. ⇒ 408pp.
 p. 8 左 l. 11 (不明) ⇒ WEBSTER'S/ DICTIONARY
 p. 8 左 l. 16 (不明) ⇒ 2段組
 p. 8 左 l. 39 (不明) ⇒ 43,400
 p. 34 右  l. 3   23.05 ⇒ 23.5
 p. 85 左  l. 23    1867年版中辞典 ⇒ 1868年版中辞典
 p. 93 右  l. 11    1931年学生版 ⇒ 1931年大学版
 p. 109 下から2行目  & Wheeler ⇒ , Wheeler, Goodrich
 p. 111 左 l. 7     (不明) ⇒ 30,700
 p. 141 左 l. 2     である。⇒ である。6巻本もあるが出版年など不明。 

*2006.3 English Dictionaries in Japan and their Compilers. Yokohama: Shumpusha, 315pp.

*2006.11  Japanese Words Borrowed into English. Yokohama: Shumpusha, 188 pp.

*2007.9  English Studies in the Tokai District, Japan. Nagoya: Arm Publisher, 80 pp.

*2007.11  Webster’s Dictionaries and the Meiji Leaders. Yokohama: Shumpusha, 408 pp.

*2010.1  The Quintessence of English Words. Yokohama: Shumpusha, pp. 220.
*2010  Johnson's Dictionary in the Age of the British Enlightenment -A Collection of Essays and Letters on his Dictionary and the Philosophy of Language in the Eighteenth Century-. Private Edition, 177pp. Assisted by Mr. Keiji Nakamura.

 Errata
 p. 14, right column, l. 15  noting ⇒ nothing
 p. 25, left column, l. 37     lesson ⇒ lessen

 p. 26, right column, l. 41  Vertuosti ⇒ Vertuosi
 p. 47, right column, l. 5    Selling-books ⇒ Spelling-books
 p. 48, left column, l. 21     him his ⇒ him in his

*2013  Johnson’s Dictionary in the Age of the Enlightenment. Yokohama: Shumpusha, pp. 566.

*2014.3  Samuel Johnson and National Dictionary. Yokohama: Shumpusha, pp. 395.

*2014.6  A Comprehensive Catalog of Webster’s Dictionaries. (Written in English) Amazon (Tokyo: Texnai), pp.163. [Written in English]

*2014.8  Twenty Stories of English Lexicography in Japan. Amazon (Tokyo: Texnai), pp. 302.

*2014.9  A Historical Dictionary of Japanese Words Used in English. (Revised and Corrected Edition), Amazon (Tokyo: Texnai), pp. 548. [Written in English]

*2015.1  A History of English Dictionaries. Amazon (Tokyo: Texnai), pp. 300

*2015.1  The Future of Learner's English-Japanese Lexicography. Amazon (Tokyo: Texnai), pp. 300


[PAPERS]

*1976.3 “Problems and Analyses of Creating TEFL Materials,” Bulletin of the Senior High School Attached to Aichi University of Education, Vol. 3, pp. 135-139.

*1977.3 “Preliminaries to Contrastive Linguistics of English and Japanese,” Bulletin of the Senior High School Attached to Aichi University of Education, Vol. 4, pp. 185-199. [Written in English]

*1978.3 “Teaching Relationships between English Sounds and Spellings,” Bulletin of the Language Center Attached to Aichi University of Education, Vol. 2, pp. 59-75.

*1978.3 “Improvement of a Deficient Vocabulary by Teaching Phonetic Symbols,” Bulletin of the Senior High School Attached to Aichi University of Education, Vol. 5.

*1979.1 “How Can We Encourage Students in the English Class?” High School Education in Aichi, Vol.11.

*1979.9 “Some Examples of Contrastive Studies of English and Japanese,” The New English Classroom, Tokyo: San’yusha, No. 120, pp. 13-15.

*1980.12 “Language Activities in English Teaching,” Education, Tokyo: Kokudo-sha, No. 392, pp. 88-97.

*1981.1 “Socio-Cultural Viewpoints on Teaching English in Japan,” The New English Classroom, No. 136, pp. 8-11.

*1981.9 “Present Simple and Expanded Tenses,” in A New Method of Learning English Grammar.  By Kurokawa, Osanai and Hayakawa. Tokyo: San’yusha, pp. 87-116.

*1981.9 “On Sentence Patterns in English,” in A New Method of Learning English Grammar. Tokyo: San’yusha, pp. 232-256.

*1981.9 “On Language and Speech,” in A New Method of Learning English Grammar. Tokyo: San’yusha, pp. 257-276.

*1982.2 “English Grammar in English I,” The New English Classroom, No. 149, pp. 49-51.

*1982.3 “How to Present Good Examples in the English Class,” Journal of the Association of English Teachers in Aichi Prefecture, No. 4, pp. 30-34.

*1982.9 “From Classroom Activities to Communicative Activities,” in English Teaching for Tomorrow. Tokyo: San’yusha, pp. 151-163.

*1982.9 “A Systematic Study of English Tenses and Aspects,” Bulletin of Nihon University of Welfare, Vol. 53, pp. 198-256.

*1983.8 “A Contrastive Study of Japanese and English Passive Expressions,” in Foundations for the Construction of Educational English Grammar. Tokyo: San’yusha, pp. 172-227.

*1985.1 “English Grammar as an Essential Cultural Component of Foreign Language Teaching,” The New English Classroom, No. 184, pp. 45-47.

*1985.2 “English Grammar in Communicative English Teaching,” The New English Classroom, No. 185, pp. 43-45.

*1985.3 “Basic Items in English Grammar and their Order,” The New English Classroom, No.186, pp. 37-39.

*1986.3 “Appropriate Selection and Ordering of English Teaching Materials,” in Practical English Teaching, Vol. 20. Kairyudo: Tokyo, pp. 93-106.

*1986.10 “Premodification by Present Participles,” Modern English Teaching, Tokyo: Kenkyusha, Vol. 23, No. 7, pp. 29-32.

*1987.5 “Teaching How to Use English Dictionaries to High School Students,” Modern English Teaching, Vol. 24, No. 2, pp. 18-22.

*1988.3 “Contrastive Analyses of English and Japanese in English Teaching,” in Courses for the New English Classroom, Vol. 9. Tokyo: San’yusha, pp. 137-148.

*1988.3 “How to Resolve Student’s Questions on English,” in Courses for the New English Classroom. Vol. 19. Tokyo: San’yusha, pp. 190-193.

*1988.3 “The Usefulness of LDOCE in English Teaching,” in Courses for the New English Classroom, Vol. 19. Tokyo: San’yusha, pp. 232-235.

*1988.7 “Problems in Making Contrastive Diagrams of Japanese and English Basic Words, Part I,” Modern English Teaching, Vol. 25, No. 4, pp. 48-50.

*1988.8 “Problems in Making Contrastive Diagrams of Japanese and English Basic Words, Part II,” Modern English Teaching, Vol. 25, No. 5, pp. 48-50.

*1991.2 “How to Use English-English Dictionaries,” Modern English Teaching, Vol. 27, No. 11, pp. 10-11.

*1993.5 “An Archaeological Study of English-Japanese Dictionaries Based on Nuttall’s Desk Dictionary,” Journal of Historical Study of English Teaching in Japan, Vol. 8, pp. 123-140.

*1993.6 “Innovative Illustrations in Two Dictionaries,” LEXICON, Tokyo: Kenkyusha, Vol. 23, pp. 27-41.

*1993.10 “Dictionaries of English Synonyms in the Meiji Era,” Journal of Historical Society of English Studies in Japan, Vol. 26, pp. 149-158.

SummaryIt was not until the middle of the Meiji era that a dictionary of English synonyms was first published in Japan. It was compiled on the basis of dictionaries of synonyms by G. Crabb and G. Graham. Crabb's dictionary was the most popular not only in Britain but also in America. Yet it was difficult for Japanese learners to understand, because it comprised the description of etymology and the quotations from classical writers. On the other hand, Graham's dictionary, which was edited for British students, had some features which enabled even Japanese students to recognize the differences of each pair of English synonyms with ease. Some dictionaries of English synonyms published in the last ten years of the Meiji era were translations of British ones. Others were compiled from the viewpoint of Japanese studying English. Their ingenious authors took into consideration trouble spots for Japanese students or linguistic interference by the Japanese language.

*1994.3 “Premodification of Nouns by Present Participles in English,” Journal of Okazaki College of Foreign Studies, No. 1, pp. 157-176. [Written in English]

SummaryAlmost all PPP constructions can be represented by this structural formula [V-ing Noun → Noun that V-s]. This means that the present participles in the constructions are habitual or permanent in meaning. But there are two kinds of exceptions to this rule. In the case of process verbs, noun phrases using the present participles are represented as in this rule [V-ing Noun → Noun that is V-ing]. The other kind of exceptions is the group of emotional verbs. Their present participles are full adjectives, because they can be preceded by intensifiers and are sometimes gradable. The examples have illustrated four uses of the PPP constructions: descriptive use, characteristic use, distinctive use, and adjectival use. The PPP constructions seem to have taken root firmly in present-day English, especially in journalism, on account of their brevity. This trend is reinforced by some types of complementary pairs (-ing and -ed, -ing an non-ing) and three forms of expanded PPP constructions, which can be generated by the same principle.

*1994.6 “A Historical Study of Countable and Uncountable Labels in English Dictionaries,” Modern English Teaching, Vol. 31, No. 3, pp. 44-46.

*1994.6 “The Historical Development of the Description of Meanings in English-Japanese Dictionaries,” LEXICON , Vol. 24, pp. 17-28.

SummaryThe earliest English-Japanese dictionaries, which were compiled by the interpreters of the Dutch language in the middle of the 19th century, had the description of meanings on the translational principle, seeking for the one-to-one correspondence of the two languages. In the Meiji Era, the description gradually improved, and a variety of techniques of description were invented, as the learning of English reached a higher level. Around 1885, some English-Japanese dictionaries came to be compiled on the bilingual principle, on which synonymous expressions were placed after the Japanese equivalents. However, this type of description is now on the decrease, because of the rise of the explanations of synonyms in the English-Japanese dictionaries. At the end of the era, some dictionaries tried to define words with the help of illustrative sentences.

*1994.7 “Noah Webster, His True Self as a Philologist,” in Language and Education. Eds. Tange and Hayakawa. Nagoya: Cyubu-Nihon-Kyohiku-Bunkakai, pp. 244-259.

*1994.10 “Two Unaccomplished English-Japanese Dictionaries in the Edo Period,” Journal of Historical Society of English Studies in Japan, Vol. 27, pp. 119-134.

SummaryTwo English-Japanese dictionaries which were compiled by the respectable interpreters of the Dutch language at the end of the Edo period were not completed. It was partly because the compilers were not specialists in the English language, and partly because they did not recognize the importance of the source dictionaries from which they edited. One of the English-Dutch dictionaries which formed the basis of the English-Japanese dictionary was considered the best and the most useful on account of its full phonetic representation and its variety of illustrative examples. And the other source dictionary was thought to be the most exhaustive in its entry words. The distinctive merits of these source dictionaries, however, turned out to be difficulties for compilers of the English-Japanese dictionaries. On the other hand, Tatsunosuke Hori, another Dutch interpreter, used a pocket English-Dutch dictionary as a base-book of his English-Japanese dictionary, knowing that in spite of its poor content it would be much easier to compile the dictionary. It took him only two years to complete it with the aid of his colleagues.

*1994.12 “Fumihio Otsuki’s Compilation of a Comprehensive English-Japanese Dictionary and his Japanese Dictionary Genkai,” Kokugo-Kokubun, Department of the Japanese Language and Literature, Kyoto University, Vol. 63, No. 12, pp. 1-13.

*1995.2 “How to Make Various Use of English Dictionaries in English Teaching,” Modern English Teaching, Vol. 31, No. 11, pp. 27-29.

*1995.3 “The Selection of the Entry Words in Johnson’s English Dictionary in Comparison with those in Picard’s English-Dutch Dictionary,” Journal of Okazaki College of Foreign Studies, No. 2, pp. 1-23.

SummaryA close examination of the entry words of Johnson's English Dictionary (1755) and Picard's Pocket Dictionary of the English and Dutch Languages (1857) reveals that the construction of the entries in each dictionary is quite alike in the following respects:
(1) the inclusion of the same obsolete words,
(2) the lack of some words of science and technology,
(3) the lexical division between technical words and names of plants (the latter are assiduously collected in the dictionary),
(4) the exclusion of proper names and words derived from them,
(5) the exclusion of the participles which are included in the modern dictionary,
(6) the inclusion of many compound words which are spelt as a word (if they are written separately, they are excluded), and (7) the lack of abbreviations as head words.
  Despite the similarities, they are radically different in their total number of the entry words, their manner of definition and the use of illustrative sentences. From these facts, it may safely be assumed that Picard used Johnson's dictionary or some other Johnsonian dictionary as a source book, reduced about twenty percent of the original entries, and transformed an academic English- English dictionary to a popular English-Dutch dictionary.
  The structure of Picard's dictionary proves to be of vital importance because it was a source book of Hori's Eiwa-Taiyaku-Syuchin-Jisyo (A Pocket Dictionary of the English and Japanese Language, 1862), which was the first full-scale English-Japanese dictionary. Hori's dictionary, which was used in Japan for about thirty years, not only played a prominent role in the early history of English-Japanese lexicography, but also determined the course of its development. For example, the lack of technical terms in the dictionary caused the emergence of a variety of technical and academic glossaries in some fields of scientific disciplines around 1870.

*1995.3 Eiwa-Jii –the First English-Japanese Dictionary Compiled in the Modern Way-,” Bulletin of Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 19, pp. 13-29.

*1995.7 “The Description of Etymology in English Learners’ Dictionaries,” Modern English Teaching, Vol. 32, No. 4, pp. 38-41.

*1995.10 “Webster’s Dictionaries in the Cabinet Library,” Journal of Historical Society of English Studies in Japan, Vol. 28, pp. 73-87.

SummaryThe Library, which was founded in Tokyo in 1884 as the central government library, has kept as many as one hundred Webster's dictionaries which are supposed to have been imported before and after the Meiji Restoration and belonged to the government agencies such as the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Home Affairs, the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Commerce and Agriculture. The close examination of these works would suggest to us how they were accepted and consulted in the Meiji Era. The library has about fifty unabridged Webster's English dictionaries, and eleven abridged dictionaries, which were usually called “Royal Octavo" in Japan. In addition, it keeps some ten small-sized dictionaries and fifteen Webster's dictionaries, large or small, published in London.

*1996.3 “English Spelling Books Published around the Meiji Restoration,” Journal of Okazaki College of Foreign Studies, No. 3, pp. 1-20.

SummaryThe role that English spelling books played in the early stages of English teaching in Japan cannot be overestimated. It is important for us to have a full understanding of their construction and the process by which they were compiled. There were three major spelling books around the Meiji Restoration.
A  Eigo-Kaitei (1866)
B  K. Ishikawa: The First Primer For the Use of the School Shoobunkwan at Yokohama (1869

C  S. Yanagawa: Yogaku-Shishin (Eigaku-bu)
  The fact that Eigo-Kaitei was a reprinted edition of the first chapter of L. Murray's An English Spelling Book (first published in York, 1804) was revealed by C. Ishihara. Another fact that The First Primer used W. Mavor's The English Spelling-book (first published in London, 1801) as a source book has been found by the present writer. The First Primer can be said to be an inadequate abridgement of Mavor's spelling book, because its editor, Ishikawa, was not able to comprehend the true objectives of the original book. A close examination of the arrangement of the two-letter or three-letter words indicates that Yogaku-Shishin (Eigaku-bu) may have been based on T. Dilworth's A New Guide to the English Tongue (first published in London, 1740).
  The three major spellers published and used before and after the Meiji Restoration were compiled on the basis of the British spellings books, but not N. Webster's speller. This is because, for Japanese students who have just begun to learn English, Webster's speller is too disorganized. On the contrary, British spelling books concentrate more on the organization and the division of letters and syllables and supplement each lesson with various practice exercises. In Britain demand for spelling books created intense competition between a variety of spellers. Among them, Dilworth's book was used for a long time as an elementary speller especially in the latter half of the eighteenth century. And in the first half of the nineteenth century Mavor's and Murray's enjoyed popularity among British elementary pupils.

*1996.12 “The Research on Antedatings of Japanese Words in OED,” Language, Tokyo: Taishukan, Vol. 25, No. 12, pp. 103-108.

*1997.3 “The Influence of Webster’s Dictionaries on the Compilation of English-Japanese Dictionaries in the Meiji Period,” Journal of Okazaki College of Foreign Studies, No. 4, pp. 1-20.

SummaryIn the first decade of the Meiji era, Webster's dictionaries were used as a guide to supplementing new technical words or deleting obsolete words. This is largely because of the insufficient and ill-balanced word list of Picard's English-Dutch dictionary which constituted a basis of the first English-Japanese dictionary (1862). In 1871, Webster's diacritic system of phonetic representation were first employed in English-Japanese dictionaries. This provided the impetus for general and successive use of Webster's spelling books and dictionaries in the Meiji period.

*1997.6 “Antedatings of Japanese Loanwords in the OED,” LEXICON, Vol. 27, pp. 138-151. [Written in English]

*1998.3 “The Historical Development of H. E. Palmer’s English Lexicography,” Journal of Institute for Human and Environmental Studies, Okazaki College of Foreign Studies, Vol. 1, pp. 47-63.

*1998.7 “The Birth and Development of Lexicography in Japan,” Journal of Institute for Human and Environmental Studies, Okazaki College of Foreign Studies, Vol. 2, pp. 1-20.

SummaryIn Japan, lexicography, as an academic study of dictionaries, has a history covering three periods of more than a century. The first period extended for some fifteen years from 1885 to 1900. Fujioka published an admirable essay on lexicography in 1896. The second period (1925-1940) sees some enlightening essays on lexicography written by H. E. Palmer. And the third period (1965-) began almost with the publication of LEXICON, the first journal of lexicography in Japan. It is regrettable, however, that there has been no idea or tradition persisting throughout these periods because lexicography has been discussed independently in separate fields at different periods.

*1998.10 “A ‘Dictionary War’ in the Middle of the Meiji Period,” Journal of Historical Society of English Studies in Japan, Vol. 31, pp. 85-96.

SummaryThis paper is an attempt to examine a 'dictionary war' between two English-Japanese dictionaries from a bibliographical point of view. They were compiled heavily dependent on Webster's dictionary and first published in the same year of 1888. One was compiled by Yutaka Shimada and published by Okura, while the other was compiled by F. Warrington Eastlake and Ichiro Tanahashi and published by Sanseido. They had many lexicographical characteristics in common. They were revised and enlarged several times in order to gain a decisive victory in the war which raged about twenty years in the Meiji period. The examination of their editions and contents reveals that they were not competing in terms of precise description of lexical items but in terms of size, total number of entry words, and repeated additions of supplements or appendixes to their main body, which cannot be regarded as substantial from a lexicographical viewpoint but very important from a historical viewpoint for a deeper understanding of the development of English-Japanese lexicography.

*1999.3 “A Theoretical Foundation for a Contrastive Study of Japanese and English,” Journal of Okazaki College of Foreign Studies, No. 5, pp. 65-85.

*1999.6 “Diagrammatic Representation of Four Categories of English Dictionaries,” LEXICON, Vol. 29, pp. 96-107. [Written in English]

SummaryBejoint (1994: 32) states, "The basic question for anyone who attempts a typology is whether to derive categories from the observation of existing dictionaries or to create categories in theory and then see how existing dictionaries fit into them. Strictly speaking, the former would be a classification and the latter a typology." My intention of this paper is not to attempt a typology of English dictionaries from a purely theoretical viewpoint but to classify them from a historical point of view and represent them diagrammatically.

*1999.6 “The Indication of Pronunciation in English Dictionaries during the 18th and 19th Centuries, and its Influence on English-Japanese Lexicography,” Journal of Institute for Human and Environmental Studies, Okazaki College of Foreign Studies, Vol. 3, pp. 23-34. [Written in English]

SummaryThe indication of pronunciation in English dictionaries published during the 18th and 19th centuries can be categorised into two types. One is the indication by means of diacritical numerals, which was innovated by W. Kenrick in 1773 and developed by T. Sheridan and J. Walker. The other is the indication by means of diacritical marks, which was first employed by J. Buchanan in 1757 by placing macrons or breves above vowels. This was developed by E. Worcester, N. Webster, C. A. Goodrich and N. Porter, and used especially in the United States.   Despite the fact that Walker's pronouncing dictionary gained widespread popularity during the first half of the 19th century, it was not employed at all in English-Japanese lexicography. Instead, Webster's system of indicating pronunciation was adopted by early English-Japanese lexicographers. The reason why it was widely used by them during the Meiji period was its relative completeness or comprehensiveness as a source book for the compilation of English-Japanese dictionaries.

*1999.6 “Reconsideration of ‘User-friendliness’ in English Lexicography,” Journal of Okazaki College of Foreign Studies, No. 6, pp. 1-11.

*2001.1 “The Emergence of Dictionaries in Britain and Japan,” Journal of Institute for Human and Environmental Studies, The University of Human Environments, Vol. 4, pp. 31-40. [Written in English]

*2003.2 “The Expansion of the Word-list in English-Japanese Lexicography,” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 127, pp. 191-204.

*2003.2 “Japanese Words in Kaempfer’s History of Japan,” Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 8, pp. 119-147.

*2003.3 “A Chronological and Systematic Study of Webster’s Dictionaries,” Civilization 21, Association for International Communication, Aichi University, Vol. 10, pp. 19-32.

SummaryThis paper has two purposes. The first is to make a rough sketch of Webster's life with special reference to the publications of his dictionaries. The second is to trace the chronology of his dictionaries, including not merely unabridged but also abridged and small-sized ones, which constituted the great tradition of Websterian dictionaries. And the third is to arrange them in a systematic way by providing a classificatory label to each Webster for the benefit of the researchers in the field of archaeological lexicography of American dictionaries.

*2003.4 “The Antedatings of Japanese Loanwords in English,” Japanese Linguistics, The National Institute for Japanese Language, Vol. 13, pp. 79-108.

SummaryThe purpose of this research is to ascertain and fix the first year of the appearance of Japanese loanwords in English literature, with special reference to those in the OED2 and its Additions. This research in which about 270 Japanese words are antedated is sure to contribute to the historical understanding of the cultural exchanges between western countries and Japan.

*2003.7 “Japanese Words in English,” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 128, pp. 1-22.

*2003.7 “Japanese Words in Chamberlain’s Things Japanese,” Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 9, pp. 141-163.

*2003.8 “Webster’s Dictionaries and Meiji Leaders,” FOCUS, Association of English Teachers, Aichi University, No. 17, pp. 63-74.

*2004.1 “The Total Numbers of Entry Words in Webster’s Dictionaries,” Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 10, pp. 217-226.

*2004.7 “Lexical Contacts between English and Japanese -Loan Translation and Loanblend-,” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 130, pp. 1-17.

*2004.7 “Notes on Japanese Borrowings into English Part I,” Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 11, pp. 51-66.

*2004.11 “On Teaching ‘Study Methods,’” Aichi University Journal of Economics, Vol. 166, pp. 445-455.

*2005.1 “Notes on Japanese Borrowings into English Part II,” Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 12, pp. 97-112.

*2005.2 “Johnson’s Abstracted Dictionary in the History of English Lexicography,” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 131, pp. 1-16.

*2005.2 “Japanese Words in The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary,” Language and Mind, Department of Mental Environments, The University of Human Environments, Vol. 4, pp. 75-88. [Written in English]

SummaryThe first edition of the SOD was published in 1933 soon after the completion of the OED. The second was published in 1936 with about 30,000 corrections. The third edition published in 1944 contains 20-page Addenda. In 1955 it was reprinted with corrections and incorporated revised Addenda and Corrigenda of 40 pages. In 1973 it was reset in a fresh and elegant typeface with the entries in the main text remained essentially as they were and incorporated revised Etymologies and Addenda. It was in 1993 that this dictionary was greatly revised and enlarged, and renamed as The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary. This history shows that corrections or revisions have been made almost every ten years. Therefore the list of Japanese words inserted into each edition is sure to reflect the historical changes in the whole vocabulary of the English language. Last of all, I must confess that the examination of Japanese words in the fourth edition was completed just after its publication but Shin-Kokusai Nihongo-ko (『新「国際日本語」講-英語辞書の中の日本文化-』原口庄輔、原口友子、洋販出版) was published in 1998, giving brief explanations or comments to every Japanese word entered in this edition. Their work has made my previous examination less valuable. Nevertheless, the comparison of my older list of Japanese words with theirs has made it possible for me to renew my list. Now I have made up mind to publish this article which includes not only the wordlist of Japanese words in the 4th edition but also those of other editions, especially the newest one. For more comprehensive information about Japanese words in the English language, readers are requested to refer to my book titled Japanese Words in English (『英語のなかの日本語語彙-英語と日本文化の出会い-』辞游社、2003.

*2005.3 “Biographical Sketches of T. Koyasu and M. Shibata,” Bulletin of Community Research Institute, Aichi University, Vol. 50, pp. 61-66.

*2005.5 “Contacts of Japanese Words with English,” FOCUS, Association of English Teachers, Aichi University, No. 18, pp. 1-32.

*2005.7 “A Short History of the International Phonetic Alphabet in Japan,” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 132, pp. 1-19.

*2005.7 “Assimilation of Japanese Words into English in 1990,” Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 13, pp. 1-22.

*2005.7 “The Philosophy of Education in Japan,” Aichi University Journal of Economics, Vol. 168, pp. 1-11. [Written in English]

*2005.10 “The Etymologies of English Words Presumed to be Borrowed from Japanese,” Journal of Historical Society of English Studies in Japan, Vol. 38, pp. 71-82.

SummaryAs many as four hundred words have been borrowed into English from Japanese, most of which have their doubtless etymologies. But there are nine dubious words which are presumed to be borrowed from the Japanese language. They are bonze, soy (soya), mebos, gingko (ginkgo), funny, hamanasu, rumaki, sharawaggi (sharawadgi) and hobo. Bonze, soy (soya), mebosu, and gingko (ginkgo) are definitely the words of Japanese origin, but they were indirectly borrowed into the English language. That is to say, they were borrowed from Japanese through Spanish or Portuguese or Dutch to English. The other five words are very difficult to ascertain their etymology.

*2005.11 “The Life of Dr. Hanji Kinoshita as a Social Scientist,” Aichi University Journal of Economics, Vol. 169, pp. 243-265.

*2006.1 “A History of Japanese-English Dictionaries,” Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 14, pp. 1-20.

*2006.1 “The New Approaches to English Language Education in the Faculty of Economics at Aichi University,” by K. Mikawa and I. Hayakawa, Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 14, pp. 39-54.

*2006.2 “The Characteristics of English in Linguistic Typology and Information Structure (1),” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 133, pp. 1-20.

*2006.3 “The Emergence of the Science of Phonetics -A Bibliography of Phonetics from 1750 to 1935-,” FOCUS, Association of English Teachers, Aichi University, No. 19, pp. 1-26. [Written in English]

SummaryThe following is a chronological bibliography on phonetics from 1750 to 1935, during which the science of phonetics emerged in the history of linguistics. Phonetics laid firm foundations for scientific researches in comparative linguistics and structural linguistics. In 2005, Routledge published Phonetics of English in the Nineteenth Century (7 volume set) as one of the series of Logos Studies in Language and Linguistics, which will suggest the interests heightened among phoneticians and linguists on this crucial period. The bibliography, which does not include papers on phonetics because of limited space, is compiled under the following rules.

Books on phonetics are chronologically arranged.
Books published in the same year are arranged according to the alphabetical order of their authors.
Editions are listed at the end of each entry in the square brackets, shown like this, [19014], which means that the 4th edition was published in 1901.

*2006.3 “Sakuro Kuno, English Linguist in Aichi Prefecture,” Bulletin of Community Research Institute, Aichi University, Vol. 51, pp. 17-22.

*2006.7 “A Chronology and Tradition of Webster’s Dictionaries,” Thinking about Language, Nagoya: Arm Publishing Company, Vol. 5, pp. 107-128.

*2006.7 “English-Japanese Learners’ Lexicography in the 20th Century -H. E. Palmer’s Contribution to its Development-,” Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 15, pp. 21-35.

*2006.7 “The Characteristics of English in Linguistic Typology and Information Structure (2),” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 134, pp. 1-16.

*2006.7 “Japanese Translations on Economics in the Meiji Era (1),” Aichi University Journal of Economics, Vol. 170, pp. 87-128.

*2006.10 “Intriguing Features of Eiwa-Jii,” Rising Generation, Tokyo: Kenkyusha, Vol. 152, No. 7, pp. 40-41.

*2006.11 “Japanese Translations on Economics in the Meiji Era (2),” Aichi University Journal of Economics, Vol. 171, pp. 63-107.

*2007.2 “Johnson’s Ideas of Compiling an English Dictionary in his Plan (1747),” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 135, pp. 291-312.

*2007.2 “Ichiro Tanahashi, Educator Born in Gifu Prefecture,” Bulletin of Community Research Institute, Aichi University, Vol. 52, pp. 11-25.

*2007.3 “Word-lists in the Dictionaries by Bailey, Johnson and Webster,” Aichi University Journal of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Vol. 32, pp. 9-20.

*2007.9 “Personal Pronouns in Yasunari Kawabata’s Short Stories (1),” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 136, pp. 296-312.

*2007.11 “Usage Notes in Bilingual Dictionaries,” Aichi University Journal of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Vol. 33, pp. 1-7.

*2008.2 “Personal Pronouns in Yasunari Kawabata’s Short Stories (2),” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 137, pp. -.

*2008.3 “Obsolete Words and Meanings in Johnson’s Dictionary,” Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 16, pp. 1-13. [Written in English]

*2009.3 “A Contrastive Study of English and Japanese Cultures through Basic Words,” FOCUS, Association of English Teachers, Aichi University, No. 22, pp. 43-64.

*2009.10 “The Emergence of a Dictionary of English Collocations in Japan,” Journal of Historical Society of English Studies in Japan, Vol. 42, pp. 1-13.

*2009.10 “English Books on Japan and Aichi University Library,” Aichi University Journal of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Vol. 37, pp. 1-16.

*2010.1 “Johnson’s Dictionary and the Philosophy of Language in the Eighteenth Century,” Language and Culture, Institute for Language Education, Aichi University, Vol. 22, pp. -. [Written in English]

*2010.1 “The Emergence of Johnson’s Dictionary (Part I),” Literary Symposium, the Literary Association, Aichi University, Vol. 141, pp. -.

*2010.10 "The Mainstream of English-Japanese Lexicography," Aichi University Journal of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Vol. 38, pp. 33-43.


[DICTIONARIES]

*1986 Obunsha’s Sunrise Japanese-English Dictionary. Tokyo: Obunsha. [This contains some one hundred contrastive diagrams made by I. Hayakawa, which show the semantic differences between Japanese and English words.]

*1996 New Anchor English-Japanese Dictionary. Tokyo: Gakken. [This dictionary is compiled on the contrastive principles. This has many cultural columns for Japanese students and a variety of diagrams, which are created to make the students understand English function words more easily. Columns and diagrams are made by I. Hayakawa.]

*1997 Super Anchor English-Japanese Dictionary. Tokyo: Gakken. [I. Hayakawa is in charge of the descriptions of function words, which is the most difficult part in compiling learner’s dictionaries, and of cultural and contrastive columns for Japanese students who are not familiar with thing British and American.]

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